The Open Image / Text by Eugenio Viola

The Open Image

In the last decades of the twentieth century, besides the instances of aesthetic standardization which register the mass adhesion to beauty canons homologated by the globalized media society, forms of active resistance develop, only in apparent continuity, with some manners of performativity related to the Body Art viewed in an historical perspective.  Referring to this kind of interventions, Lois Keidan prefers, since a long time, to use the expression “Live Art”.

In my opinion, this term well represents the complexity of experiences  emerging «through forms, contexts and spaces in order to open up to new artistic models, new languages for the representation of ideas, new methods of stimulating the public and new strategies of intervention».[1] An heterogeneous range of practices which turn round the presence, the performative dimension and the perceptive experience of sounds and visions. A successful contamination that has permitted the development of new forms of expression related to action but rooted in the present time and not restricted by tradition and conventions.

The Modern Primitives come within the more general phenomenon of neotribalism, a term taken from Michel Maffesoli[2] to explain a range of habits and behaviors related to a renewed attention to the body language, to be considered as a holder, as a heap of signs (Baudrillard), run by practical explorations, often bloody, of the self which make topical the practices of many indigenous and tribal cultures and reactivate ancestral rituals which reverse the ethnic hierarchies.

Developed in the United States from a small subset of the BDSM community at the end of the seventies, Modern Primitivism becomes a larger movement whose influence touches at various levels the language of body changes and saturates also a certain aspect of Body Art by loading it with a radical, extreme value, unknown to the first phase of the mentioned movement. In the meantime, except for a few isolated cases, the Body Art had gone trough a gradual withdrawal into itself.

Piercing, branding, tattooing and scarifications become a way to recuperate its own uniqueness, a way to regain possession of its body and feelings. They are a form of rebellion, of protest against the globalized society that brought the body to “standardize itself”, to lose its identity. Alterations, modifications, lacerations, wounds and pain become a way to gain a different, full and deep form of self-knowledge.

Fakir Musafar, who takes his name from an old Indian fakir lived during the XIX century, starts, at a very young age, an existential journey through different cultures and their corporal practices. Musafar describes the search for spiritual enlightenment he made during all his life by controlling the flesh with all sort of actions: cuts, burns, openings of the body, tattoos, suspensions, neck stretching, lengthening of the penis. Fakir defines pain as a “preliminary word” for a strong feeling that, if actively sought and expected, is not adverse.[3] He argues that body suffering can produce an intense experience of dissociation, hallucination and loneliness. It is an ancestral form of spirituality. Fakir has the merit of releasing a number of practices from their primitive deviance, by making them acceptable at least. He contributes «to bringing to light those practices considered, until then, bizarre or associated with marginal realities, and thus to giving shape to what has become, in few years, a range of well- known visible practices and widely discussed», [4] suggesting «un-destructive ways to recognize, interpret and negotiate the widely variegated sphere of the self-inflicted practices of body modification».[5] Bloody actions took place in the historical Body Art as well, from Chris Burden – the artist tragically existential (Amelia Jones)- to the Viennese Actionism, but the  controlled nature of Chris Burden’s actions in the early seventies is very different from the one of artists such as Ron Athey and Franko B, borderline figures in the art system – from which they are partially absorbed – who act as a trait d’union between the bodily instances, strictly considered, and the new bodily wave.

It is not a coincidence that practices and actions of the Wiener Aktionismus have been retrieved during the eighties.  As noted by Malcolm Green, the Actionists are unexpectedly promoted from «personae non gratae to the status of artists».[6] In the nineties, «Brus, Mühl, Schwarzkogler, and Nitsch share the stage with Fakir, Flanagan and Athey ».[7]

Eric Gans talks about a sacrificial aesthetic[8] demonstrating how aesthetic forms, born from the bloody sacrificial practices, evolved from being a necessary feature of social organization into a intra-psychic element of the human condition: [9] «This end of the ability of the aesthetic to discriminate between the sacrificial and the antisacrificial is not the end of art. On the contrary, it liberates the aesthetic from the ethical end of justifying sacrifice. Aesthetic form remains sacrificial, but sacrifice is no longer understood as a necessary feature of social organization; it is merely a “psychological” element of the human condition». [10] It is the vertigo given by the open image that «crosses time according to the modality of the unthought, symptoms and survival: removals and return of the repressed, repetitions and revisions, traditions and missing links, tectonic movements and earthquakes of the surface». [11]

Didi Huberman finds a history of figuration in what is physical instead of ideal: beyond any anthropomorphism and representation, metaphors become metamorphosis, signs are transformed into symptoms and the flesh ,finally, becomes an image.

As a matter of facts, Catholicism is teeming with saints and martyrs’ stories whose hagiographies are full of mystical experiences related to the physical sphere, a blend of mysticism and desire that runs throughout Western Christianity, from St. Francis of Assisi to St. Catherine of Siena, from John of the Cross to St Teresa of Avila. Art history conforms itself to these stories: so many skinnings, crucifixions, tortures, tempting ecstasies and pleasure-seeking martyrologies are the privileged subject of such religious art that Lacan said: «nowhere more than in Christianity, the work of art as such show itself as what it has always been in all places and times- obscenity». [12]

In my curatorial incursions into the “degenarations ” of the body practices, I had the chance to work, in different occasions, with Ron Athey and Franko B, the two leading artists of these trends, the bearers of a new sensibility that has left behind it a host of imitators. Visionary artists, whose body becomes a stage for eroticism and destruction. Fear, violence, alienation and perversion become the characteristic features of their radical actions that cast their glance beyond the limits of representation. Through the exposition of their naked, performed, brutalized, humiliated body they put on an hagiography of suffering, they set up their Passion and laical martyrdom. Both of them raise to the rank of a desacralized Ecce Homo, whose body is marked with the trauma, pain and suffering of the social body. Moving swiftly on the thin line of contrasts – abject and sublime, courtly and popular, sacred and profane, transcendence and desire, domination and loss, licit and illicit, memory and recall – Athey and Franko B generate a series of unsettling short-circuits that reflect the controversial reality of present time, its shadow.

Ron Athey sets up a theater of cruelty with apocalyptic tones, where self-mutilation, cuttings, incisions and bleedings, trace the outlines of a dynamic otherness of the body and physicaliness. Actions like Martyr & Saints, 4 Scenes in a Harsh Life, Deliverance, The Solar Anus inspired by Bataille and his last work  History of Ecstasy, trace a sort of metaphorical Via Crucis marked by several acts, halfway between sacred and profane, dreams and reality , tenderness and violence.

Starting from current events and his own biography, the artist stages a personal hagiography by revisiting Christian iconography. The performative act is always based on a duality between the pure and the sordid, the redemption and the damnation, which forms its fulcrum and the force. As an HIV-positve person, who lives with the taboo of blood, pain and death, as a homosexual negotiating his right to love and live his sexuality, as an atheist who has built his “faith” on the shadows of the Catholic Church, as an artist demonized by the religious institutions and the conservative wing of American politics, Ron Athey spreads the blend of some of the most harsh realities of the Western society straddiling two centuries.

Franko B’s visionary and oppressive sensibility derives from the iconographic tradition of Memento Mori and the spirituality of the horror which shapes the “deadly” Baroque of Counter-Reformation.  The composition’s balance of his work, however, refers to a more classic formal ideal, shows the brutality of our time but also expresses an existential inspiration, recalls the tenderness of the human soul that unravels his entire being into the world.

I Miss You, Long Live Romance, Do not Leave Me This Way, these are the titles of some of Franko B’s performance during which the artist, covered with a heavy layer of white lead, comes to the stage with deep cuts on his body, playing with the aesthetic and emotional impact of bleeding. A silent and dismayed public take part in actions indicating the intrusiveness of the imprisonment’s places, the closing of the body, the social relations’ paralysis, the pain threats. Actions that, over the vividness of the aesthetic impact, open themselves to a romantic meditation, a desire analyzed through multiple shades: separation, loneliness, fear of abandonment, submission … In conclusion this is a work presenting itself as a huge and unconditional act of love.

Image 1

Ron Athey

History of Ecstasy

Corpus. Art in Action, Madre Museum

2009

photo Amedeo Benestante

Courtesy the artist, Madre Museum, Naples

 

Image 2

Franko B

I Miss You

2003, Tate Modern, London

Photo Manuel Vason

Courtesy the artist

 

Image 3

Angela Barretta

ΦΑΡΜΑΚΟΝ

2009

Corpus. Art in Action, Madre Museum

2009

photo Amedeo Benestante

Courtesy the artist, Madre Museum, Naples

 

Image 4

Gabrjiel Savic Ra

Balkan Opera. Final Act

Corpus. Art in Action, Madre Museum

2009

photo Amedeo Benestante

Courtesy the artist, Madre Museum, Naples

 

 

Text by

Eugenio Viola

(translated from Italian by Juliana Fisichella)

 


[1] L. Keidan, This must be the place, in “Performance and Place”, curated by L. Hill e H. Paris, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, Hampshire, UK and New York, 2006, p. 9

[2] cfr. M. Maffesoli, It. Ed. “Il tempo delle tribù. Il declino dell’individualismo nelle società postmoderne” (The Time of the Tribes: the decline of Individualism in mass society), Guerini Studio, Milan, 2004

[3] R. McClean Novick, Skin Deep: Interview with Fakir Musafar, 1992, http://www.levity.com/mavericks/mus-int.htm

[4] B. Marenko, Segni indelebili. Materia e desiderio del corpo tatuato.  Feltrinelli, Milano, 2002, p.42

[5] Ibidem

[6] M. Green, Brus, Muehl, Nitsch, Schwarzkogler: Writings of the Vienna Actionists, Atlas Press, London, 1999, pp. 9-11

[7] Ibidem

[8] Cfr. E.Gans, Sacrificing Culture, in “Chronicles of Love and Resentment”, n.184, October 1999, http://www.anthropoetics.ucla.edu/views/vw184.htm

[9] D. Polovineo, L’estetica sacrificiale di Eric Gans: dal paesaggio sacrificale cruento alla origine delle forme estetiche, in “Studia patavina: rivista di scienze religiose”, Facoltà Teologica dell’Italia Settentrionale-Sezione di Padova, 2008, vol. 55, n. 1, pp. 163-190

[10] Ibidem

[11] G.Didi-Huberman, It. Ed. L’immagine aperta. Motivi dell’incarnazione nelle arti visive, Bruno Mondadori, Milano, 2008, p. 7

[12] J. Lacan, It. ed. Il seminario Libro xx Ancora (The Seminar XX, Encore: On Feminine Sexuality, the Limits of Love and Knowledge), Einaudi, Torino, 1983, p. 116

 


ITALIAN VERSION

L’immagine aperta

Negli ultimi decenni del Novecento, oltre i fenomeni di standardizzazione estetica che registrano l’adesione di massa a canoni di bellezza omologati dalla società massmediatica e globalizzata, si sviluppano forme di resistenza attiva solo in apparente continuità con alcune forme di performatività legate alla Body Art nella sua fase ormai storicizzata. In riferimento a questa tipologia di interventi Lois Keidan preferisce, da tempo, utilizzare l’espressione Live Art, termine che a mio avviso ben rappresenta questa complessità di esperienze che emergono «attraverso forme, contesti e spazi per aprirsi a nuovi modelli artistici, nuovi linguaggi per la rappresentazione delle idee, nuove metodologie di attivare il pubblico e nuove strategie di intervento». [1] Un insieme eterogeneo di pratiche che ruotano intorno alla presenza, alla dimensione performativa e all’esperienza percettiva di suoni e visioni. Una felice contaminazione che ha permesso la possibilità di nuove forme espressive legate all’azione ma radicate nel tempo presente, non limitate da tradizione e convenzioni.

I Modern Primitives rientrano nel fenomeno più generale del neotribalismo, termine mutuato da Michel Maffesoli [2] per spiegare una serie di abitudini e comportamenti legati a una rinnovata attenzione per il linguaggio del corpo, inteso come contenitore, come carnaio di segni (Baudrillard), attraversato da pratiche esplorative del sé spesso cruente, che riattualizzano le pratiche di numerose culture indigene e tribali, riattivano rituali ancestrali che invertono le gerarchie etniche.

Il Modern Primitivism si evolve da un piccolo sottoinsieme della comunità sadomaso alla fine degli anni Settanta negli Stati Uniti per trasformarsi in un movimento più ampio, la cui influenza tocca il linguaggio delle modificazioni corporali a vari livelli, saturando anche una certa accezione della Body Art, caricandola di un valore radicale, estremo, sconosciuto alla prima fase bodista che, tranne pochi casi isolati, aveva subito nel frattempo un progressivo ripiegamento su se stessa.

Piercing, branding, tatuaggi e scarificazioni diventano un modo per recuperare la propria unicità, una via per riappropriarsi del proprio corpo e delle proprie sensazioni. Una forma di ribellione, di protesta nei confronti della società globalizzata che ha portato il corpo a “massificarsi”, a perdere la propria identità. Alterazioni, modifiche, lacerazioni, ferite e dolore diventano il modo per recuperare una forma di conoscenza del Sé diversa, integrale e profonda .

Fakir Musafar, che mutua il suo nome da un vecchio fachiro indiano vissuto nell’’800, inizia da giovanissimo un viaggio esistenziale attraverso le varie culture e relative pratiche corporali. Musafar descrive la ricerca dell’illuminazione spirituale che ha compiuto nel corso della sua vita attraverso il dominio della carne esperito attraverso ogni tipo di azioni: tagli, bruciature, aperture del corpo, tatuaggi, sospensioni, stiratura del collo, allungamento del pene. Fakir definisce il dolore una «parola pregiudiziale» per una sensazione intensa che, se attivamente cercata e prevista, non è avversa,[3] sostiene che la sofferenza del corpo può produrre una intensa esperienza di dissociazione, allucinazione e solitudine. Una forma di spiritualità ancestrale. Merito di Fakir è sdoganare una serie di pratiche dalla loro devianza primigenia, rendendole quanto meno accettabili, contribuisce «a portare allo scoperto pratiche fino ad allora considerate bizzarre o associate a realtà del tutto marginali e quindi a dare forma a quello che nel giro di pochi anni è diventato un insieme di pratiche conosciute visibili e ampiamente discusse»,[4] proponendo «modalità non distruttive attraverso cui riconoscere, interpretare e negoziare la sfera piuttosto variegatissima della pratiche auto inflitte di modificazione corporea».[5] Anche nella Body Art storica c’erano state delle azioni cruente, da Chris Burden all’Azionismo Viennese, ma la natura pulita e controllata delle azioni, agli inizi degli anni Settanta, di Chris Burden, artista tragicamente esistenziale (Amelia Jones), è molto diversa dalle azioni di artisti come Ron Athey o Franko B, personaggi borderline rispetto al sistema dell’arte, da cui sono parzialmente assorbiti, che fungono da trait d’union tra le istanze bodiste propriamente intese e la nuova bodily wave.

Non è un caso che nel corso degli anni Ottanta sono recuperate le pratiche e le azioni del Wiener Aktionismus. Come nota Malcom Green, gli Azionisti sono improvvisamente elevati «da personae non gratae allo statuto di artisti».[6] Negli anni Novanta «Brus, Mühl, Schwarzkogler, e Nitsch dividono la scena con Fakir, Flanagan e Athey».[7]

Eric Gans parla di un’estetica sacrificiale[8] dimostrando come le forme estetiche, nate dalla prassi sacrificale cruenta, si siano evolute da caratteristica necessaria dell’organizzazione sociale a elemento intra-psichico della condizione umana:[9] «questa fine della capacità dell’arte di discriminare tra il sacrificale e l’antisacrificale […] libera l’estetico dal fine etico di giustificare il sacrificio. La forma estetica rimane sacrificale, ma il sacrificio non è considerato più a lungo come un fattore necessario di organizzazione sociale; è piuttosto un elemento ‘psicologico’ della condizione umana».[10]

È la vertigine data dall’immagine aperta che «attraversa il tempo secondo la modalità dell’impensato, del sintomo, della sopravvivenza: rimozioni e ritorno del represso, ripetizioni e rielaborazioni, tradizioni e anelli mancanti, movimenti tettonici e sismi di superficie».[11]

Didi Huberman rintraccia una storia della figurabilità non nell’ideale ma nel corporeo, oltre ogni antropomorfismo e figurazione, le metafore diventano metamorfosi, i segni si tramutano in sintomi e la carne, infine, si fa immagine.

D’altronde il cattolicesimo pullula di storie di santi e di martiri le cui agiografie sono piene di racconti di esperienze mistiche legate alla fisicità, un connubio di misticismo e desiderio che percorre tutta la cristianità occidentale, da San Francesco d’Assisi a Santa Caterina da Siena, da Giovanni della Croce fino a Santa Teresa d’Avila. La storia dell’arte si adegua: quanti scuoiamenti, crocifissioni, torture, quante estasi suadenti e martirologi gaudenti costituiscono il soggetto privilegiato di tanta arte sacra, a tal punto che Lacan ebbe a dire: «da nessuna altra parte come nel cristianesimo, l’opera d’arte come tale si verifica essere in modo più patente quel che è sempre e dappertutto-oscenità».[12]

Nelle mie incursioni curatoriali all’interno delle “degenarazioni” delle pratiche corporali, mi sono trovato a lavorare, in occasioni diverse, con Ron Athey e Franko B, i due artisti principali di queste tendenze, alfieri di una nuova sensibilità che ha lasciato dietro di sé una schiera di epigoni. Artisti visionari, il cui corpo diviene teatro di erotismo e distruzione. Paura, violenza, alienazione e perversione diventano gli elementi caratterizzanti le loro azioni radicali che gettano lo sguardo oltre i limiti della rappresentazione. Attraverso l’ostensione del proprio corpo nudo esibito, brutalizzato, mortificato, inscenano un’agiografia della sofferenza, allestiscono la propria Passione, il proprio laico martirio. Entrambi assurgono al rango di Ecce Homo desacralizzato, sul cui corpo si iscrivono i traumi, il dolore e la sofferenza del corpo sociale. Muovendosi agilmente sulla sottile linea dei contrasti: abietto e sublime, aulico e popolare, sacro e profano, trascendenza e desiderio, dominio e perdita, lecito e illecito, memoria e ricordo, Athey e Franko B generano una serie di cortocircuiti spiazzanti che restituiscono la realtà controversa del presente, la sua ombra.

Ron Athey allestisce un teatro della crudeltà dai toni apocalittici, in cui automutilazioni, tagli, incisioni e perdite di sangue, tracciano i contorni di una alterità dinamica del corpo e della fisicità. Azioni come Martyr&Saints, 4 Scenes in a Harsh Life, Deliverance, The Solar Anus ispirata a Bataille e l’ultima History of Ecstasy, tracciano una sorta di via crucis metaforica scandita da più atti, a metà strada tra sacro e profano, sogno e realtà, tenerezza e violenza. Partendo dall’attualità e dalle proprie vicende biografiche, l’artista mette in scena una personale agiografia rivisitando l’iconografia cristiana. L’atto performativo si basa sempre su una dualità che ne costituisce il fulcro e la forza, tra il puro e il sordido, redenzione e dannazione. Come sieropositivo che convive col tabù del sangue, del dolore e della morte, come omosessuale in trattativa per amare e vivere la propria sessualità, come ateo che ha costruito la sua “fede” sulle ombre della chiesa cattolica, come artista demonizzato dalle istituzioni religiose e dall’ala conservatrice della politica statunitense, Ron Athey rende pubblica mescolanza di alcune tra le più crude realtà della società occidentale a cavallo tra i due millenni.

La sensibilità visionaria e opprimente di Franko B attinge alla grande tradizione iconografica del memento mori e alla spiritualità dell’orrore che informa il “mortifero” barocco controriformato. L’equilibrio compositivo della sua opera rimanda tuttavia ad un ideale formale più classico, restituisce la brutalità della nostra epoca ma allo stesso tempo esprime un afflato esistenziale, ricorda la tenerezza dell’animo umano che dipana tutto il suo Essere nel mondo. I Miss You, Long Live Romance, Don’t Leave Me This Way, questi i titoli di alcune performance di Franko B durante le quali l’artista, ricoperto di un pesante strato di biacca, si presenta in scena con profonde incisioni sul proprio corpo, giocando sull’impatto estetico ed emotivo dello scorrere del sangue. Un pubblico silenzioso e sgomento partecipa ad azioni che indicano l’invadenza dei luoghi della reclusione, della chiusura del corpo, la paralisi dei rapporti sociali, le minacce del dolore. Azioni che oltre l’icasticità dell’impatto estetico si aprono a una meditazione romantica, al desiderio investigato attraverso molteplici sfumature: separazione, solitudine, paura dell’abbandono, sottomissione…Un lavoro che si presenta, in ultima analisi, come un enorme, incondizionato atto d’amore.

 


[1] L. Keidan, This must be the place, in “Performance and Place”, a cura di L. Hill e H. Paris, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, Hampshire, UK e New York, 2006, p. 9

[2] cfr. M. Maffesoli, trad.it. Il tempo delle tribù. Il declino dell’individualismo nelle società postmoderne, Guerini Studio, Milano, 2004

[3]R. McClean Novick, Skin Deep: Interview with Fakir Musafar, 1992, http://www.levity.com/mavericks/mus-int.htm

[4] B. Marenko, Segni indelebili. Materia e desiderio del corpo tatuato. Feltrinelli, Milano, 2002, p.42

[5] Ibidem

[6] M. Green, Brus, Muehl, Nitsch, Schwarzkogler: Writings of theVienna Actionists, Atlas Press, London, 1999, pp. 9-11

[7] Ibidem

[8] Cfr. E.Gans, Sacrificing Culture, in “Chronicles of Love and Resentment”, n.184, October 1999, http://www.anthropoetics.ucla.edu/views/vw184.htm

[9] D. Polovineo, L’estetica sacrificiale di Eric Gans: dal paesaggio sacrificale cruento alla origine delle forme estetiche, in “Studia patavina: rivista di scienze relifgiose”, Facoltà Teologica dell’Italia Settentrionale-Sezione di Padova, 2008, vol. 55, n. 1, pp. 163-190

[10] Ibidem, [This end of the ability of the esthetic to discriminate between the sacrificial and the antisacrificial is not the end of art. On the contrary, it liberates the esthetic from the ethical end of justifying sacrifice. Esthetic form remains sacrificial, but sacrifice is no longer understood as a necessary feature of social organization; it is merely a “psychological” element of the human condition]

[11] G.Didi-Huberman, trad.it. L’immagine aperta. Motivi dell’incarnazione nelle arti visive, Bruno Mondadori, Milano, 2008, p.7

[12] J. Lacan, ed.it. Il seminario Libro xx Ancora, Einaudi, Torino, 1983, p. 116

 

Eugenio Viola, photo Camo Graphy, Bogota

 

Eugenio Viola (Naples 1975) is an art critic and an independent curator. From 2009 to 2012 he was the Project Room curator at Madre, the Contemporary Art Museum in Naples. He got his PhD at University of Salerno, and he specializes in the experiences and theories related to performance and bodily poetics. On this subject he edited the Orlan’s monograph (ed.Charta, Milan, 2007), and published a number of essays. He collaborates on a regular basis with “Flash Art” (Italy), and “artforum.com” (U.S.A. He has  curated various exhibitions, in Italy and abroad, among others: Marina Abramović – The Abramović Method (PAC, Milan, 2012); Transit, (Madre Museum, Naples / Townhouse, Cairo /PiST, Istanbul / CCA, Tel Aviv / State Museum, Thessaloniki, 2009-2011); Corpus. Arte in Action, festival that presented, among others, performances of: Ron Athey, Lee Adams, Kira O’Reilly, Tobias Benrstrup, Jamie Shovlin and Lustfaust, Milica Tomic, Tania Bruguera, Regina Josè Galindo, Teresa Margolles, Maria Josè Arjona, Cristian Chironi, Jacopo Miliani, Luigi Presicce, Davide Balliano, Francesca Grilli (Madre Museum, Naples, 2009-2012); Francesco Jodice – Babel, Museum of Contemporary Art, Zagreb, 2011; Orlan: Le Rècit (Musée d’Art Moderne de Saint-Etienne Métropole / Kunsthalle of Tallinn, 2007); V.I.P. / Very Important Portraits di David LaChapelle (Museum of Capodimonte, Naples, 2006).